the daily walter malino does swan lake (with divertissement purge) 4-17-20

Anyone having read The Purging Lutheran this week has been treated to the glorious illustrations of Italian illustrator, Walter Milano. Through his daring artwork we have covered universal topics such as science, politics, animal husbandry and tourism. Finally, the arts gets its due today but not just any art but the gentlest of them all – ballet.

Walter does his inimitable take on Swan Lake, composed by P. I. Tchaikovsky. Despite its initial failure, it is now one of the most popular ballets of all time. Mr. Milano has taken the extra step and boldly re-interpreted this Russian folk tale to its logical conclusion where nature strikes back at humanity and its pestering ways.

This is your typically genteel ballet director’s vision of Swan Lake.

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Somebody went a step further and included feathers because, swans, you know.

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Even interpretive dance gets its shot at this beloved choreography:

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But Walter Milano steps in and gives us his nightmarish version.

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“A swan looking at the world from a misty calm lake is like a creature looking at the world from space! All he sees is a large herd of people governed by the most stupid and most inadequate people!”
Mehmet Murat ildan

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And now time for today’s enjoyable diversion – the daily purge.

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If your name happens to be Aergia, Socordia or Ingnavia, did you know your parents believed you were the personification of sloth, idleness, indolence and laziness? If so, that’s not hard to believe during these ‘uncertain and challenging times‘ where we are cooped up in our homes awaiting deliverance from The Wuhan. Self-isolation brings out the indifference in most of us so don’t feel special if you see yourself as a slob.

This book was one the kids, Aleksandrs and Marta, would have used in high school. They are real smartypants – in good ways – when it comes to these classical mythology. Let’s look up some other terms and definitions, shall you?

Phobias
Meaning: Fear

Greek Myth: Phobos is the Greek word for fear, but originally Phobos was a son of Ares who was, indeed, the representation of fear, essentially in battles. He and his brother Deimos (panic) eventually became names of moons of Mars (the Roman version of Ares).

 

Achilles’ Heel

Meaning: A person’s weak spot.
Greek Myth: A hero of the Trojan War, Achilles was a Greek hero whose mother Thetis was a Nereid, or sea goddess. Since Achilles was destined to die young, Thetis dipped him into the river Styx, which would render him invincible. However, she had held him by the heel, thus leaving a vulnerable area. He would later die, as prophesized, by an arrow to his heel.

 

To Harp

Meaning: Incessantly bother.
Greek Myth: Jason, in quest for the golden fleece, encounters King Phineus, who is continually tormented by Harpies. The Harpies are winged creatures whose origins might actually represent wind spirits. To King Phineus, the Harpies are grotesque women who constantly snatch his food and drink and will not let him be.

 

School’s out.

 

Proverbs 15:19

The path of lazy people is overgrown with briers;
    the diligent walk down a smooth road.

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